We are professionals and hobbyists working in Berlin who are interested in C++, the language, its uses and the things people build with it.
We are open for everybody who knows C++ or is interested in learning it or really anybody who wants to hear about the advantages (and fun!) of native programming.
Some of us are involved in the C++ standardization process, some have contributed to the boost libraries. Some of us work in medical imaging and applications, in scientific computing, some develop innovative and intuitive desktop applications, some are specialists in cross-platform development.
We meet about once a month. Anybody is invited to give a talk about a subject that has something to do with C++. Did you build something with C++ and want to share? Have you checked out the latest proposals from the standardization committee? Do you need help with a project of yours?

Montag, 5. Mai 2014

May meeting - C++ in the demo scene


for our next meeting we are happy to announce a very interesting talk about C++ in the demo-scene from David Geier and Eivind Liland, see below. The meeting will take place at 20th  May, 7 p.m. in the C-Base.
As always talks will start at 8 p.m.

"The demoscene is a computer art subculture that specializes in producing demos, which are audio-visual presentation that run in real-time on a computer. The main goal of a demo is to show off programming, artistic and musical skills." (Wikipedia)

Eivind and David are demosceners since decades. In this talk they're going to show you two of their award-winning, real-time graphics demos, both highly optimized for different limitations and platforms, and both written in C++.

Turtles all the Way Down by Brain Control (2013) is a 64k-intro for the PC. It's an almost 5 minutes long audio-visual journey using cutting edge algorithms in the areas of computer graphics, generative art and music synthesis. Being a 64k-intro, all textures, 3D objects and music fit into a single executable of merely 65.536 bytes.

Matt Current by Shitfaced Clowns (2007) is a demo for the Gameboy Advance. It features at that time never-seen-before graphics effects and a software-rendered 3d engine that pushes the device's hardware to their limits. One prevailing opinion is that only by coding in 100% assembly one can push such platforms beyond their limits. Eivind will explain how they used C++ to carefully squeeze the maximum out of every cycle of the GBA's 16 MHz CPU.

Though seemingly esoteric, all the techniques employed to realize these demos have their application in professional software development nowadays. In times of GHz multi-core processors, GPUs and terabyte hard-drives, performance critical code and compact code for embedded and mobile platforms still plays an important role. Eivind and David are going to guide you through the process of creating these graphics demos. They talk about the used algorithms and tools keeping the focus of how C++ was used to do the job.

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